Completed Research Projects

Photo by rawpixel.com on Unsplash

Photo by rawpixel.com on Unsplash

 

Scoping Review on Compliant Flooring

Compliant flooring is an intervention that may reduce the incidence and severity of fall-related injuries in healthcare settings, including acute and long-term care, but few sites have implemented compliant flooring. Health care decision makers have indicated that one barrier to uptake is lack of synthesized evidence about key performance aspects of compliant flooring.

To address this gap, we conducted a ‘scoping review’ (a type of literature review) to describe the extent, range, and nature of research activity about compliant flooring, as well as to identify gaps in research. We searched six academic databases (to find published studies on compliant flooring) and various sources of grey literature (to uncover unpublished information).

Two researchers systematically screened records for eligibility, extracted data from 84 eligible records, and synthesized results from these records according to four themes: biomechanical efficacy, clinical effectiveness, cost-effectiveness, and workplace safety. Toward the goal of meeting the information needs of healthcare decision makers tasked with preventing fall-related injuries, we delivered a webinar in partnership with CADTH and distributed a Research Brief summarizing the results of this review.

Collaborators: Dr. Dawn Mackey, Dr. Stephen Robinovitch, Dr. Fabio Feldman, Dr. Andrew Laing

Funding: CIHR Knowledge Synthesis Grant

Key Personnel: Dr. Chantelle Lachance, Michal Jurkowski, Ania Dymarz

Publications: BMJ Open, PLoS One, Research Brief

Photo by Cristian Newman on Unsplash

Photo by Cristian Newman on Unsplash

 

Ergonomic Evaluation of Compliant Flooring

Compliant flooring aims to prevent fall-related injuries among older adults, including residents of long-term care. Compliant flooring also impacts the working conditions of long-term care staff, but research on this topic has been very limited. In particular, due to its low stiffness and susceptibility to deform under load, compliant flooring may increase rolling resistance versus standard flooring. In turn, maneuvering wheeled equipment (e.g., patient lifts, wheelchairs, carts) on compliant flooring could expose long-term care staff to higher forces than standard flooring.

In this project, we quantified the hand forces required for long-term care staff to push loaded floor-based lifts and wheelchairs over compliant flooring relative to standard flooring. We also assessed staff perceptions of pushing difficulty and compared forces to tolerance limits. We conducted this project in partnership with Revera’s Royal City Manor long-term care home in New Westminster, British Columbia.

Collaborators: Dr. Stephen Robinovitch, Dr. Fabio Feldman

Funding: SFU President’s Research Start-up Grant, CIHR Team Grant in Strategic Teams in Applied Injury Research, CIHR Team Grant in Mobility and Aging, SATech, Inc, CIHR Frederick Banting and Charles Best Canada Graduate Scholarship, AGE-WELL Graduate Student Award in Technology and Aging, MSFHR Scholar Award

Key Personnel: Dr. Chantelle Lachance, Dr. Alexandra Korall, Colin Russell

Publications: Human FactorsJournal of Applied Ergonomics

Photo by Tim Gouw on Unsplash

Photo by Tim Gouw on Unsplash

 

Perceptions of Compliant Flooring

Compliant flooring aims to prevent fall-related injuries in high-risk health care environments, such as long-term care. But, uptake of compliant flooring has been limited. Guided by the knowledge-to-action framework, we explored barriers and facilitators to adoption of compliant flooring as a fall-injury prevention strategy within long-term care, and we identified pressing directions for future research. We did this by conducting in-depth interviews with senior managers from long-term care, and we hosted an interactive one-day stakeholder symposium with decision makers from health care, industry, and research.

Collaborators: Dr. Stephen Robinovitch, Dr. Fabio Feldman, Pet-Ming Leung

Funding: CIHR Knowledge Synthesis Grant, CIHR Frederick Banting and Charles Best Canada Graduate Scholarship, AGE-WELL Graduate Student Award in Technology and Aging, MSFHR Scholar Award

Key Personnel: Dr. Chantelle Lachance, Valeriya Zaborska

Publications: Canadian Journal on Aging, Journal of Housing for the Elderly